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PostPosted: Thu Oct 02, 2008 3:20 pm 

Joined: Fri Jun 23, 2006 6:15 am
Posts: 40
Even though the drop in vent will cover the cut I cannot stand to look at a sloppy wavy cut on a notch going around a floor opening. Myself I will set the fence on my saw and plunge the board down on top of the blade until it comes thru then trim it out with my jig saw to the corners. Any advice on any better and safer ways. Some people drill holes in the corners big enough for the jigsaw blades. Any other ways quicker and more precise?
Mark Efird
Traditional Hardwoods & Mouldings


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 02, 2008 3:29 pm 

Joined: Fri Sep 30, 2005 6:35 pm
Posts: 2655
Location: Sydney, Nova Scotia
Did you try a router and template?

Allan Mc Donald


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 02, 2008 3:58 pm 
Mark,

I do the same........


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 02, 2008 11:36 pm 

Joined: Thu Oct 02, 2008 11:09 pm
Posts: 135
Location: Camano Island WA
I do the same. I always make sure I have a sharp blade. For the jig saw, you can get blades that cut on the down stroke to eliminate burs on the topside of the cut.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 03, 2008 6:09 am 

Joined: Wed Sep 28, 2005 5:21 pm
Posts: 654
Location: North of Boston
Whats the best way to clamp down the template?


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 03, 2008 6:45 am 

Joined: Fri Sep 30, 2005 6:35 pm
Posts: 2655
Location: Sydney, Nova Scotia
g.pierce wrote:
Whats the best way to clamp down the template?


g.

I have tried many ways in the shop. Since I am usually working with "taped together" pieces of wood I use doublesided tape to hold the pieces to an mdf template. In this case I don't have to worry about damage to the mdf, I just scrape the tape off with a chisel.

I have also tried many different ways to hold down medallion templates. I have finally settled on using 8 strips of Super Heavy Duty Duck Tape fastened to the bottom of the template.

I let the tape (sticky side up) extend out 4" from the edge of the template and then I double it back "over itself" to make a 2" (non-sticky) tab. These taps are very strong and they in turn can be easily taped down to the floor with painter's tape.

I can honestly say that I have never had a template shift or move on me.

You may note that I only asked Mark if he tried a router and template. Despite the fact that I find a router and template foolproof if it is set up properly there are many other methods that are quicker and easier.

Allan Mc Donald


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 03, 2008 10:02 am 

Joined: Thu Oct 02, 2008 11:09 pm
Posts: 135
Location: Camano Island WA
The market I have been in here the last upteen years has not once asked me to do a medalion. But I imagine using screws to hold the template down while I do the cutting. Of course the template wood be predrilled and countersunk so I wouldn't destroy it on site.

But what do I know, I'm just imagining something I've never had to do before.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 03, 2008 11:41 am 

Joined: Fri Sep 30, 2005 6:35 pm
Posts: 2655
Location: Sydney, Nova Scotia
Steelaworkn wrote:
The market I have been in here the last upteen years has not once asked me to do a medalion.




But I imagine using screws to hold the template down while I do the cutting. Of course the template wood be predrilled and countersunk so I wouldn't destroy it on site.

Destroy the template?????? I'd me more concerned with screw holes in the hardwood floor!

Allan Mc Donald




But what do I know, I'm just imagining something I've never had to do before.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 03, 2008 8:27 pm 

Joined: Wed Sep 03, 2008 2:20 pm
Posts: 41
Location: visalia ca
fein multimaster.best 200 ever spent


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 05, 2008 7:49 am 

Joined: Mon Aug 25, 2008 3:51 pm
Posts: 676
Mark,

We used to do that plunge thing until a guy cut his hand doing it. Officially now we lower the blade below the surface of the table, set the fence, hold the board down and get another guy to slowly raise the blade up into the board. (Off the record, I still do the plunge thing ;) )


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 05, 2008 3:09 pm 

Joined: Tue Aug 08, 2006 8:26 pm
Posts: 1239
IMO, plunge cutting on a table saw is not very dangerous but the basic rules of safety and knowing how a saw blade works prevents injury. Some people are just accident prone and I will stop there. I have never finished a plunge cut with a jig saw but rather trim with a sharp chisel. The only secret here (if it is a secret) is to use a nice straight grained board for the application. If you know your tablesaw, you can plunge cut to within 5/8" or so of your end line. As long as your saw kerf leaves 1/4" of sandable meat on top of the tongue and groove, you are not cheating your customer of wood floor life. If you chose a straight grained board before making this plunge cut, you can easily trim the excess wood with a sharp chisel. I have always said, the same guy that installs a floor should also know how to sand it. Doesn't it piss you off when you find a big face grained board that you have to scrape installed around a door jamb or some other obstacle. This only shows the installers lack of professionalism or might I say, intelligence of his work. Ric


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 05, 2008 9:54 pm 

Joined: Tue Oct 18, 2005 3:52 pm
Posts: 116
Location: russellville,AR
if you do use a jig saw for corners try breaking the blade to 3/4 " works great . superken


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 05, 2008 10:32 pm 

Joined: Wed Jul 02, 2008 8:11 pm
Posts: 1988
Location: Minnesota
I do the plunge method, then the miter saw. Grab the piece with your hand and it breaks off. Finish off where the blade didn't come through with a rasp. Perfect every time. Same thing for flush mount. Ole


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 07, 2008 7:52 pm 

Joined: Thu Jul 31, 2008 6:43 pm
Posts: 29
Location: Summerside, PEI, Canada
During my days of selling sandpaper for AEI we also sold the Fein Supercut tool which is similar to the Multimaster but the blade has a hexagonal nut to lock the blade on so it won't vibrate loose. Its great for plunge cuts and for toe kicks, door jambs, and board removal. It tends to heat up a bit and the blades are expensive but its one of the tools you'll find will help you when you are in a situation where nothing else will do the job. You can find them on e-bay or go to the Fein or CUMI websites.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 08, 2008 5:53 pm 

Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2006 6:23 pm
Posts: 936
Location: central Illinois
My guys have come to prefer the festool saw and rotary zip for flush vents etc. They have it down so its fast & efficient.

Ralph


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